World MX Grand Prix – Round 4 – Genk BELGIUM

125 Main Event:



1. James Dobb – KTM

2. Sven Breugelmans – YAM

3. Mark DeReuver – YAM

4. Patrick Caps – YAM

5. Erik Eggens – KTM





250 Main Event:



1. Gordon Crockard – HON

2. Mickael Pichon – SUZ

3. Yves DeMaria – YAM

4. Mickael Maschio – KAW

5. Chad Reed – KAW





500 Main Event:



1. Stefan Everts – YAM

2. Joel Smets – KTM

3. Marnicq Bervoets – YAM

4. Willie Van Wessel – HSB

5. Avo Leok – KTM





125 Points:



1. James Dobb – 95

2. Erik Eggens – 45

3. Steve Ramon – 40

4. Alessio Chiodi – 39

5. (tie) Seguy, Breugelmans – 36





250 Points:



1. Mickael Pichon – 95

2. Gordon Crockard – 67

3. (tie) Beirer, Coppins – 43

5. Claudio Federici – 38





500 Points:



1. Stefan Everts – 95

2. Joel Smets – 72

3. Marnicq Bervoets – 58

4. Jonny Lindhe – 37

5. Andy McFarlane – 31

More Photos from the 2001 Motocross des Nations

More Photos from the 2001 Motocross des Nations





The French team won the 55th edition of the Motocross des Nations in Namur on the last Sunday in September. It was the first-ever victory for France. The Belgian and New Zealand teams finished second and third. The French team of Luigi Seguy, David Vuillemin and Yves Demaria had a historical day in a historical place!



The Citadelle track is located on the top of a hill over looking the town of Namur. The name of the track comes from what’s on the very top of the hill – the Citadelle, which is a castle-like fortification built centuries ago.



The French team was considered by many as a ‘B’ team without 250 World Champion Mickael Pichon and SZbastien Tortelli, but the three selected riders proved themselves very capable. They didn’t win any individual motos, but they did strong races with Seguy (thirteenth after a bad start and fifteenth after two crashes), Vuillemin (third and fourth despite bad starts) and Demaria (fifth and third). All of them were motivated for this race: Seguy had to verify his choice from the French team manager as other names were on the list to race the 125 class, Vuillemin had to race with a different bike set-up as his mechanic was stuck in the USA, and Demaria had to prove that he is one of the best riders of the GP series.



Stefan Everts of the Belgian team got the best possible individual result on his favorite track, winning both motos he raced. Steve Ramon did great in the 125 class, placing his Kawasaki tenth and eighth and winning the 125 class. Unfortunately, Joel Smets had a terrible day – ‘one of the most difficult days of my career’ he said, as he had technical problems with his bike. He went off the track in the first race with brake problems, and then on the last lap the engine went out. In his second moto he crashed with another rider, lost his radiator cap and had to stop twice in the pits.



Third place went to New Zealand with consistent races from Hurley, Coppins and King. Australia could of been on the podium but Michael Byrne broke his wrist in the first race. Chad Reed won the second moto but was involved in a crash at the start of the last one.



The USA team of Mike Brown, Kevin Windham, and Ricky Carmichael were not able to attend because of 9/11 security concerns.







Overall standings



1. France (Seguy, Vuillemin, Demaria) 28 points

2. Belgium (Ramon, Smets, Everts) 37

3. New Zealand (Hurley, Coppins, King) 47

4. Great Britain (Sword, Nunn, Nicoll) 56

5. Germany (Kanstinger, Beirer, Eckenbach) 57

6. Australia (Byrne, Reed, McFarlane) 73

7. Sweden (Johansson, Karlsson, Lindhe) 73

8. Portugal (Goncalves, Rodrigues, Goncalves) 80

9. South Africa (Swanepoel, Hunt, Dugmore) 90

10. Finland (Pyrhonen, Vehvilainen, Aaltonen) 94

11. Estonia 99

12. Czech Republic 104

13. Slovenia 109

14. Ireland 113

15. Netherlands 113

16. Spain 115

17. Italy 116

18. Latvia 125

19. Denmark 130

20. Switzerland 149







Special Thanks to Valentin & Christophe Guinberteau, MX2K.com, Fernando Bianco, Filippo Ceccucci, DORNA, & Pascal Haudiquert









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The winning Frech team

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Begian great Joel Smets talks about his day

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Stefan Everts

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Steve Ramon – Belgium

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Stefan Everts – Belgium – 500 World Champion

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Stefan Everts. He was the best individual rider on the day. His team

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David Vuillemin – nice job

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Steve Ramon – Belgium (darn those 500’s hurt!)

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Brazil team member

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Seguy

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Seguy – part of Team France

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Chad Reed – Australia. Coming to the USA in ’02!

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Josh Coppins – New Zealand

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Kurt Nicoll – England. He’s normally the KTM team boss, and came out

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Team France – the Winners!

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Yves DeMaria – France

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David Vuillemin – France

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Brazil rules!

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Norway rules!

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The Swedes know how to have fun!

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Anticipation …

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French fans have a lot to be happy about!

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See that fortress up on the hill? The track is up there. It overlooks



Mickael Pichon: 250 World MX Champion

Mickael Pichon: 250 World MX Champion





Mickael Pichon: 250 World MX Champion - Photo 1 of 5

Mickael was one of the first to follow the road pioneered by Jean-Michael Bayle to the U.S.A. Mickael won the 125 French Supercross Championship three times (’91-’92-’93), and made his debut in the AMA Supercross Series in ’93, winning the San Diego 125 West event.



Back then his career was split between the World Championships and AMA Supercross. His best finish in the 125 World Championship was sixth in 1994. A year later he went to the States to stay, signing a contract with Mitch Payton’s Kawasaki Pro Circuit team. He won three events and the 125 East championship, and was fifth in the 125 Nationals. In 1996, he won six events and the 125 East championship again: a star was born!



1997 was not a good year for Mickael. After signing with US Suzuki to race the 250 class, he was out almost the entire season due to a serious injury (he broke his thigh-bone). Things became better in 1998 though. Still with Suzuki, Mickael was fifth in AMA Supercross (2nd in Las Vegas) and fourth in the AMA 250 Nationals (winning the Glen Helen round). In 1999 Pichon climbed another step. Riding for Honda, he took fourth in AMA Supercross (2nd in Anaheim, Phoenix and Indianapolis, 3rd in Irving/Dallas and St. Louis).



Mickael had a small but well documented run-in at one of the AMA National rounds that ultimately began a new chapter in his life. He left the US and began racing the 250 World Motocross Championship in mid-season.



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In the first race (Poland), Mickael was second in one moto, and then followed that with a second again in Belgium: a quick announcement of what he could do in Europe. He looked forward to the 2000 season.



The 2000 250 World Championships began under his dominion: only Frederic Bolley matched his speed, and after seven rounds third position (Pit Beirer) was 90 points behind. But at the end of July Mickael broke his collar-bone. He tried an incredible come-back just a few days later, but his body wasn’t able to respond. He was second at the end.



This year, with the World Championships totally changed (only one moto and all of the classes in one day and one track) Mickael Pichon wiped out everyone, winning races and then winning races and winning races again. Only Gordon Crockard (twice), Claudio Federici and Chad Reed beat him on four occasions (out of 14!).



I met him in Castiglione del Lago, in the next to the last race of the Championship, where he won. He had clinched the championship at the previous round.







Mickael Pichon: 250 World MX Champion - Photo 3 of 5

Filippo: Mickael, probably no one knows better than you both sides of the best ways of racing motocross worldwide. You were twice AMA 125 East Champion, one of the best in supercross and in the Nationals and now, back in Europe, you have won the 250 World Championship. What are the differences between motocross in Europe and in the United States?



Mickael: Well, I think that the differences are mainly that in the U.S. they have a great supercross championship, they have a lot of money, a lot of people and the best organization in the world. Because of that they have very good riders in supercross.



When I was in the U.S. I didn’t work as hard as I do now, and I never felt so good. You know it is very important to feel good, wherever you’re riding. You need to be in the best shape physically and mentally.



If you compare motocross …. it’s different. The tracks are much different in Europe. In Europe you have to be good in many different kinds of tracks: we have mud, we have hard tracks, we have sand tracks …. different kinds of dirt and a lot of specialists, like Italians on the hard tracks, Belgians on the sand tracks and Frenchmen in the mud. In the U.S. it’s always much the same: everyone is pretty good on everything, but there are non differences on tracks: there is only one sand track, but it’s not like Belgium or Holland. I don’t think that in the U.S they’re going much faster than we’re going. Many guys at the same speed, except for Carmichael who’s faster, but all of the rest are pretty close together.



This year was very difficult for me, even if it could not seem that way because I won many races. It was difficult to win and I tried very hard and I had to do a lot of training. So I think it’s difficult to compare for me. If you look at my results, you should think that it’s easier in Europe because I won here, but, as I said, I’m not in the same shape as I was in the U.S. In Europe I feel at home, which is very good. I have my family, my friends … I ride at the best I can ride now. In the U.S. I never rode at the best I could do.







Mickael Pichon: 250 World MX Champion - Photo 4 of 5

In Europe you are a step higher than all the others. There are no questions, there are just the results to say that, but do you think that there is a different kind of mentality in the drivers? I’m thinking that in Europe after you overtake one driver the story is over, in the AMA Nationals I saw (on TV) any driver can fight back as soon as he’s been passed.



I don’t think so. It isn’t really right, because in the U.S. the tracks make the difference. In Europe the tracks are very slippery and the traction is never good, we have tracks with a lot of stones … we fight against the track, that’s the main difference. In the U.S. the traction is always good, you have many ruts, many different lines, which you don’t have in Europe. Sometimes here the tracks have only one line and it’s very difficult to pass, so once you pass one guy it’s hard for him to pass you back. In the U.S. you have many choices of lines, many choices of everything. And that’s what I think makes the difference, really.







Are there any things that you miss, now, of the American way of riding?



Well, the tracks there are really good, and that’s one thing for sure, and as you said, when someone passes you, you can respond …. it’s easier to respond. In the U.S. you have three or four ruts, in Europe you have often only one good line, and it’s difficult to pass back. You have to be stupid and make same crazy move.



One thing I miss a lot is supercross, because the AMA Supercross Championship is really good, with many people. It’s very popular and the organization is really good and the people are very close. You have 50,000 people and you’re a rider and that’s very big. We don’t feel the same thing in Europe right now.







Let’s talk now about your World Championship. You wiped out everyone. At the beginning of the year, were you sure that you were going to do that?



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I was sure even last year, before breaking my shoulder. I worked very hard physically, I tested a lot on the bike, much more testing than previously. We worked a lot on the bike, to make it very good for starts, because with only one moto the start is very important.



I tried to be complete, to have the bike good, my conditioning good, and good technique. I worked a lot on my technique, and everything was going fine and the whole Team worked really hard to win the Championship.



A team doesn’t need to be just the best rider – you have to be good on everything, a good rider is not enough. This year we combined everything together, so that helps to make me strong mentally. I always have good times in timing, always good starts, and we had the results come along with that.







What do you think of the new World Championship, with the single moto?



For me I don’t like it so much, but we have to deal with it. We tried to convince them to leave us the two motos, but nobody really listened to the riders. For now we have to deal with only one moto, but I hope in the future we’re going to come back to the two motos. For now we have nothing to say. We tried to say “No! Not one moto!” but they say that they are the bosses and we are the riders and we only have to ride. So now we wait and see.







I heard that you wanted even to race in two different classes, 125 and 250 …



Yes. Because with only one moto it’s very easy, and there’s a lot of training and I hoped it could be possible for some riders to ride in two classes, because it’s not very difficult to race only one moto. But for me it’s going to be difficult, first of all because the F.I.M. doesn’t allow it, and there’s also Suzuki. They (Suzuki) are really working on the 250 and the four strokes, so they don’t want to try hard on the 125. They want to keep working on the 250, to win another World Championship, and during that time get ready for the future with four strokes.







Thank you very much. You’ve been very kind, Champ.



Thank you.


Photo Special – The U. S. Open – 2001

Photo Special – The U. S. Open – 2001





It was Ricky Carmichael’s first race for Honda. Jeremy McGrath and Travis Pastrana made their return to racing after time away. But Ricky Carmichael swept both nights of action.



Carmichael was dominant in Friday night’s main, taking the victory. Tim Ferry looked good on the big YZ four-stroke, and finshed second. Mike LaRocco was his usual hard charging self for third. Jeremy McGrath was fast, but had a bobble in the main event that dropped him back, he finished fourth. Kevin Windham won his heat, got fifth in the main.



Carmichael was again dominant Saturday night on his Honda. Two motos – two wins – overall champ. He won this event last year too. McGrath was equally as impressive – he crashed in the first corner, restarted last, and came all the way back to second. Kevin Windham finished third. Kelly Smith had a nice ride on his KTM for fourth, and Mike LaRocco rounded out the top five. Travis Pastrana didn’t seem to be suffering any effects from previous injuries. He finished ninth both nights.



Overall Final Standings By Moto
1. Ricky Carmichael HON 1 1
2. Jeremy McGrath YAM 4 2
3. Kevin Windham SUZ 5 3
4. Mike LaRocco HON 3 5
5. Tim Ferry YAM 2 8




Saturday night – 250 class
1. Ricky Carmichael HON
2. Jeremy McGrath YAM
3. Kevin Windham SUZ
4. Kelly Smith KTM
5. Mike LaRocco HON
6. Nick Wey
7. Mike Brown KAW
8. Tim Ferry YAM
9. Travis Pastrana SUZ




Friday night – 250 class
1. Ricky Carmichael HON
2. Tim Ferry YAM
3. Mike LaRocco HON
4. Jeremy McGrath YAM
5. Kevin Windham SUZ
6. Nick Wey
7. Brock Sellards
8. Mike Brown KAW
9. Travis Pastrana SUZ




Photos by Scott Cox



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Photo Special - The U. S. Open - 2001 - Photo 1 of 32

fKevin Windham waiting to be introduced to the Las Vegas crowd

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Kevin Windham practicing starts

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Kevin Windham thru the outside corner

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United States Marine Co.

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Start!

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All the KTM Juniors!

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Grant Langston & David Pingree

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Jeremy McGrath – nice helmet huh?

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KTM Motocross Team Manager Ron Heben

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Travis Pastrana waiting to be introduced

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Travis P. practicing starts

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Elvis, Elvis, Elvis, Elvis …. AKA The KTM Juniors!

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Selvaraj parties with Elvis, Elvis, and Elvis!

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Eric P. He helped turn the idea of a US Open into reality.

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Travis Pastrana

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Jeremy McGrath returned to racing. He finished second overall.

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Jeremy McGrath

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Mike LaRocco

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Mike LaRocco

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Steve Lamson

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Kelly Smith

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John Dowd – check out that helmet!

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Tim Ferry

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Ricky Carmichael. First race on Honda. He won.

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Kelly Smith – Team KTM

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Tim Ferry – waiting to be introduced.

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Johnny Dowd – he’s a freak! Still going strong at 80 … 90 … however old he is!!!

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RC (Ricky Carmichael)

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Mike Brown – 125 National Champ

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Mike Brown v.2

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Brock Sellards

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Arenacross Champ Buddy Antunez



Mini – Flashback – 1996 AMA Motocross

Mini – Flashback – 1996 AMA Motocross





Jeff Emig would go on to win four races and the championship. Jeremy finished second, but won seven events. In the 125 class, Steve Lamson took the championship with nine wins. Kevin Windham would finish second on the year. He had three victories.



Here is how the season ended:



Final point standings for the 1996 125 National Championship:



1. Steve Lamson – HON – 584

2. Kevin Windham – YAM – 455

3. John Dowd – YAM – 439

4. Buddy Antunez – KAW – 301

5. Mike Craig – HON – 299

6. Tim Ferry – SUZ – 271

7. Ezra Lusk – SUZ – 259

8. TIE: Robbie Reynard – HON, Chad Pederson – KAW – 244

10. James Dobb – SUZ – 243







Final point standings for the 1996 250 National Championship:



1. Jeff Emig – KAW – 566

2. Jeremy McGrath – HON – 556

3. Mike LaRocco – SUZ – 428

4. Greg Albertyn – SUZ – 403

5. Larry Ward – HON – 350

6. Kyle Lewis – YAM – 306

7. Brian Swink – HON – 300

8. TIE: Ryan Hughes – KAW, Damon Bradshaw – YAM – 297

10. Jimmy Button – YAM – 272



Mini - Flashback - 1996 AMA Motocross - Photo 1 of 12


First corner at Glen Helen for the 125’s

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First corner at Glen Helen for the 250’s

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Greg Albertyn with Roger DeCoster assisting

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Damon Bradshaw riding for Yamaha

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John Dowd and Steve Lamson mix it up on the start. Lamson would win his second 125 championship this year

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Jeff Emig – he would go on to win the 250 National Championship this year

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Jeff Emig – notice multi-time champ Mike Kiedrowski helping out

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‘Factory’ Phil Lawrence

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Jeremy McGrath (one of our favorite photos ever)

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Jeremy McGrath

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Jeremy McGrath

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Kevin Windham on the YZ 125




These images are by Noah’s dad, Bill Q. They are from the Glen Helen National in ’96.



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