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Yamaha asks for reform in fuel testing

Published May 5th, 2004







Courtesy Yamaha Motor Corp. USA





Cypress, CA (May 5, 2004) – Yamaha Motor Corporation, U.S.A. announced today that it is urging the AMA Pro Racing Board of Directors to review and reform its fuel test procedures. Yamaha is suggesting that the AMA Pro Racing Board of Directors consult other interested parties as well as Yamaha in developing appropriate fuel collection and testing procedures.



In 2004, the AMA established standards for lead and continued it standards for oxygen content and specific gravity in fuel used in AMA sanctioned supercross and motocross events. However, the AMA has yet to establish criteria that would demonstrate that its testing procedures are consistent, reliable and accurate.



Yamaha’s Keith McCarty says “The AMA’s current fuel testing standards and procedures need significant reform. We have requested the AMA to adopt scientifically accepted fuel sample collection and test procedures, and to conduct the tests consistently to avoid dispute and ensure rider equity at future events.”



Mr. McCarty continues “Yamaha is proud that Chad Reed won the supercross championship and we congratulate him on his series victory. He’s an outstanding athlete and sportsman, and we think that it was a special win by a special individual.”



He concludes “Racers and fans deserve the certainty of a fair race and a fair result. That is why we’re asking the AMA to make supercross and motocross fuel testing more professional and equitable. Yamaha hopes that the AMA will respond to our request and take positive steps to reform its fuel collection methods and conform its testing procedures to recognized scientific standards before the next racing season begins May 15.”



After the April 17, 2004 at the Dallas supercross, the AMA penalized three riders for disputed fuel test results, including Team Yamaha’s Chad Reed. Reed was penalized 25 points. The AMA denied his appeal because he had not provided test results on the subject fuel – even though no such tests were then due under AMA rules. Furthermore, the AMA had refused to provide any of the tested fuel samples to Reed or Team Yamaha, denying them the opportunity to refute the AMA’s allegations. Despite the AMA’s severe penalty, Reed won the supercross championship Series on May 1, 2004 in Las Vegas, NV.


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