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U.S. Senate Amendment Introduced to Exempt Kids Machines From Lead Law

PICKERINGTON, Ohio — U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) has introduced language that would exempt youth off-highway vehicles (OHVs) from the lead law that effectively bans the sale of these machines at the end of the year, the American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) reports.

Senate Amendment 264, co-sponsored by Sen. Jon Tester (D-Mont.), would exempt youth OHVs from the lead-content provisions of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) of 2008, which is commonly known as the lead law. Those provisions contain overly restrictive lead-content limits that have virtually destroyed responsible youth motorized recreation.

SA 264 would amend S. 493, which is a small business program reauthorization bill.

The CPSIA bans the making, importing, distributing or selling of any product intended for children 12 and under that contains more than a specified amount of lead in any accessible part. It also requires that all children’s products undergo periodic testing by independent laboratories approved by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), which is responsible for implementing the law.

The CPSC has delayed enforcing key portions of the law until after the end of the year. Unless the CPSIA is changed, the sale of youth-model motorcycles and ATVs will effectively be banned.

The Klobuchar amendment is similar to H.R. 412, the Kids Just Want to Ride Act, introduced by Rep. Denny Rehberg (R-Mont.) and supported by 55 of his colleagues. The AMA has enthusiastically supported Rehberg’s legislation, and now also supports SA 264.


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